gratitude-thanksgiving

Gratitude

Recently, I facilitated a day of reflection for members of the cancer support center where I work. The theme was gratitude.

It may seem paradoxical to invite people to be grateful when they have cancer, because being grateful during difficult times can seem unimaginable; but I think that difficult times are when we need gratitude the most.

I shared this quote from Elisabeth Kubler-Ross:

Yes, my primary mission has been to bring death out of the closet because everyone needs to view death as an opportunity. Death can show us the way to live. It’s only when we truly know and understand that we have a limited time on earth—and that we have no way of knowing when our time is up—that we will begin to live each day to the fullest, as if it was the only one we had.

Death is a natural part of life, most easily seen in nature at this time of year, but a diagnosis of cancer or some other serious illness can also shine a light on our mortality.

gratitude-thanksgiving

When I was the director of a lay mission program, I spent Thanksgiving one year at St. Philip’s Mission in Swaziland, Southern Africa. The Mission is on a dirt road in the middle of nowhere, as rural as can be. The AIDS epidemic was raging throughout the country, and the Mission’s orphanage reached capacity soon after opening.

One of our missioners told the story of visiting the hut of a dying woman. Her three young children were at her side and the eldest, a girl of six, used a syringe to give her mother sips of water.gratitude-thanksgiving

Soon after that visit, the woman died and her three children moved to the orphanage.

During that Thanksgiving visit, we gave each child a book.They reacted with surprise and delight. “For me?” they asked as they lovingly cradled their gifts. It was as if they had been handed a precious diamond.

Their joy and gratitude brought tears to my eyes as I thought about my reaction to gifts I had received. Was I ever this grateful? Did I ever allow myself to be so humble that I could delight in something so small?

It occurred to me that their deep awareness of death led them to a deep sense of gratitude. Knowing their mortality helped them live fully.

It is a dance, this movement from death to life, from sadness to joy.

Since I moved to Michigan a few years ago, I had many moments of sadness and deep grief. And then, I will spend a day with my family or have a random encounter with a cousin or reconnect with a place in Detroit that was significant in my childhood—and I am filled with joy and gratitude that I made the move.

Taking a day away helps me to see how blessed I am, to be grateful and to trust that the best is yet to come.

 

 

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4 thoughts on “Gratitude

  1. annemarielom

    I receive great joy giving a gift when it is received with gratitude. This prompts me to be deeply grateful when I receive a gift. Even if I don’t like or find the gift useful, I can be grateful for the thoughtfulness of the giver. This extends to God’s generosity for so many gifts. Thank you, Madeline, for calling this to my attention!

    Reply
  2. Widow's Manna

    Thank you for sharing this.
    Yes indeed the experience of death does cause a deeper sense of gratitude. I have seen the ravages of cancer, but I have known deep thanksgiving in the days of mourning. The litter things are indeed quite special. I loved reading this and being reminded that in the darkness of death, we merely stand in His shadow. Darkness is not dark to Him. Bless you.

    Reply
  3. Madeline Bialecki Post author

    I am praying for greater “light” this Advent (as in putting on the “armor of light” (Romans 13:12) and walking “in the light of the Lord (Isaiah 2:5)). Any “darkness” is ours and not His. Thanks for sharing.

    Reply

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