Leaning into vulnerability

The day after my neighbor Margaret came to mind while on retreat recently, I walked the labyrinth. At the center, I stopped and prayed for insight: Why had the memory of my pledge to Margaret come to mind?

The words from Psalm 89 came to me: “I have made a covenant with my chosen…”

I walked back through the labyrinth repeating those words.

I have made a covenant with my chosen.

What are you trying to tell me, God?

And then I remembered that when I was fifteen years old, I had said to myself, “One day I am going to write a book about my life, and it will start like this: From the time I was eight years old, I knew God had called me in a special way.

God-vulnerability-trust

I didn’t know exactly what it meant that God had called me, how it had happened or why God had picked me, but I knew it is true. God had chosen me when I was eight years old.

At that early age, God had somehow made a covenant with me. And now, on retreat almost sixty years later, God was reminding me of that covenant.

The thing about the pledge I made to Margaret is that it was made with my full knowledge and consent. God’s covenant when I was eight was one-sided; God initiated it. I didn’t fully consent.

For many years, I was noncommittal about God. Having been chosen by God only seemed to make me different and somehow weird—I was the kid who loved going to church.

Church was my refuge. As I inhaled the smell of burning beeswax candles, I also breathed in the mystery of God’s grace. I loved the hushed quiet and the space to retreat into myself.

Inside church, I felt close to God. It was there that I experienced God’s desire to be in a relationship with me, where I heard God asking me to say yes to the covenant God initiated.

Inside church, I could be God’s but once outside, I did not know how to trust that relationship or to live it out.

While my fifteen-year-old self knew that something significant had happened to me when I was eight, my adult self has been clueless as to how that could be of interest. On retreat, God gave me an insight.

I went back to the first piece I posted on this blog more than six years ago. God is doing something new.

Much has changed over these past six years—new home in a new state, working in a near field, new friends.

But the most significant change is being vulnerable enough to share my story—with all its difficulties and traumas. I am learning to move beyond shame and to trust that the sky will not fall if I reveal something long kept secret.

My part of the covenant is to tell how God’s grace has infused my life and transformed pain into compassion, fear into trust.

God-vulnerability-trust

6 thoughts on “Leaning into vulnerability

  1. jamesrneal

    Beautiful post. I also felt a strong call when I was young, 9-12 years old. For reasons I still do not understand, I let the fire go dim until I was 42. So much time wasted … but I know I need to overcome that. Also, I love the labyrinth.

    Reply
    1. Madeline Bialecki Post author

      Thanks, James. When I was 38, I had an epiphany about my eight-year-old God moment. I will write about it at some point. I, too wasted a lot of time feeling unworthy of God’s call and so living a rebellious life. I was one hot mess in my twenties and early thirties, but never lost my tie to God. I feel so blessed.

      Reply
  2. annemarielom

    Your relationship with God and your ability to articulate it are always a joy to read. Thank you, Madaline, for being vulnerable and for responding to God’s choice!

    Reply
    1. Madeline Bialecki Post author

      Thanks,Anne Marie. So much of my “courage” in writing about my relationship with God comes from Jim’s encouragement. I can still hear his voice in my heading urging me to write.

      Reply

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