Tag Archives: potential

spirituality-prayer-lent

Change my heart

Recently, I have spoken about my work at a cancer support center to several Optimist Clubs, and every time I hear the Optimist Creed, this line stands out:

To give so much time to the improvement of yourself that you have no time to criticize others.

One of my Lenten plans was to see the people in front of me. Sometimes I don’t actually see the person standing in front of me, but rather I see a version of that person which is based on my past experiences with him or her, and I know that is not always accurate.

Instead, I want to try to see as God sees—to see the potential in each person, to see the best in each one. I want to be less critical and more hopeful about the people in my life.spirituality-prayer-lentUsually, though, I form an impression of someone when we meet. If someone is prickly, I tend to think, “This is a prickly person.” I can then find it difficult to change that initial impression, to let go of my expectations that someone will act in a particular way. I can easily devote attention and energy to the faults of others while conveniently overlooking my own. spirituality-prayer-lentI know, though, that when I get a glimpse of myself as God sees me, it is a better version of me. From God’s perspective, I am capable of being my best self—loving, forgiving, accepting and merciful. When others see the best in me, and let me know that, I am more likely to be that person (or at least be more aware when I am not). The ability of others to see the best in me helps me to grow into the person God created me to be.

God invites me to focus on improving myself, on fixing my own faults before I start looking at others.spirituality-prayer-lentWhen I am aware of my own flaws, I am less likely to be critical of others. When I remember that I grow and change, it is easier to believe that others also grow and change—and also easier to see their potential.

Practicing seeing as God sees also makes me more compassionate. Seeing the potential in others and allowing them the space to grow into their potential reminds me we are all on the path to discovering who God created us to be. Hoping that I and others can live up to the vision God has for us shifts my vision from pessimism to optimism; God’s vision is always hopeful and expansive.spirituality-prayer-lentEvery person who stands before me has the potential to become all that God intended. My desire is to accept the people who come into my life without criticism or judgment and to imagine them as their best selves, the selves God created them to be.

 

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Advent-hope-expectations

Say “yes” to something new

Late have I loved you, beauty so ancient and so new….And see, you were within and I was in the external world and sought you there….You were with me, and I was not with you. The lovely things kept me far from you….You called and cried out loud and shattered my deafness…you put to flight my blindness….You touched me, and I am set on fire to attain the peace which is yours.” ~St. Augustine

I am a late bloomer, and I take great comfort in St. Augustine’s finding God late in his life.

He reminds me that God’s time is not the same as our time, and God’s expectations are not the same as ours. With God, there is always time to discover God within, to gain insight and wisdom, to start something new. God continually calls us to move beyond our limited expectations.

Advent is a time of preparation for something new. It is a good time to check my eyesight—to notice where I am looking—and to review my expectations to see how they align with what God asks of me. Like St. Augustine, I can be looking outside, when God is calling me to look within.

This Advent, Elizabeth and Zachariah have caught my attention in a new way. Perhaps it is because they were advanced in years (as am I) when God did something completely unexpected and entirely new for them.

Most often, we think of the later years as a time of slowing down, doing less, taking it easy. But God brought a baby into their lives—new life with new demands and responsibilities. I imagine they were thrilled and celebrated their good fortune.

But, it could not have been easy; there must have been a period of adjustment. I imagine Elizabeth and Zachariah had to steel themselves against gossip and judgment and can picture the scene when their neighbors gathered at the well: Did you hear that Elizabeth is pregnant? At her age? What were they thinking?

Being old and doing something new can cause a few raised eyebrows and questioning looks. Really? You’re going to do what?

Advent-hope-expectations

As if there is some old-age line that we cross and then it is time for retirement homes and rocking chairs with nothing new on the horizon.

One of my favorite books is The Invisible Wall by Harry Bernstein. It is the story of his young life as a Jewish immigrant in England. He wrote the book when he was in his nineties—his first book—but the story had been with him a lifetime. I love that he took a chance and dared to write and share his story.Advent-hope-expectationsI feel like I am just growing into my own skin and coming to a deeper sense of God’s desires for my life. Like St. Augustine, Elizabeth and Zachariah—and Harry Bernstein, I want to stay open to God’s invitation to create. I want to say yes when God surprises me with something new..Advent-hope-expectations